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THURSDAY, Nov. 19, 2020 (HealthDay News) — A low-cost, group-delivered lifestyle intervention is associated with a significantly lower risk for progression to type 2 diabetes among high-risk individuals, according to a study published online Nov. 2 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Michael Sampson, M.D., from the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust in the United Kingdom, and colleagues assessed whether a group-based lifestyle intervention (with or without trained volunteers with type 2 diabetes) reduced the risk for progression to type 2 diabetes in people at increased diabetes risk. Participants were randomly assigned to a control arm receiving usual care (178 individuals), a theory-based lifestyle intervention arm of six core and up to 15 maintenance sessions (INT; 424 individuals), or the same intervention with support from diabetes prevention mentors who were trained volunteers with type 2 diabetes (INT-DPM; 426 participants).

The researchers found that a total of 156 participants progressed to type 2 diabetes: 22.8 percent receiving usual care, 13.7 percent receiving INT, and 15.0 percent receiving INT-DPM. For type 2 diabetes incidence, there was no significant difference seen between the intervention arms (odds ratio [OR], 1.14; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.77 to 1.7; P = 0.51). However, each intervention arm was associated with significantly lower odds of type 2 diabetes (INT: OR, 0.54 [95 percent CI, 0.34 to 0.85; P = 0.01]; INT-DPM: OR, 0.61 [95 percent CI, 0.39 to 0.96; P = 0.033]; combined: OR, 0.57 [95 percent CI, 0.38 to 0.87; P = 0.01]). For all glycemic levels, ages, and social deprivation groups, the effect size was similar. Intervention costs per participant were low at $153.

“We have now shown a significant effect in type 2 diabetes prevention, and we can be very optimistic that even a modest weight loss, and an increase in physical activity, in real-world programs like this have a big effect on the risk of getting type 2 diabetes,” Sampson said in a statement.

One author disclosed receiving personal fees from WW UK.

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