fbpx Skip to main content

Recent research highlights the crucial role of noncoding RNAs in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, offering a deeper understanding of the disease and opening doors for targeted therapies.

  • Noncoding RNAs, including microRNAs, long noncoding RNAs, and circular RNAs, contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.
  • Dysregulation of noncoding RNAs can impact signaling pathways involved in systemic lupus erythematosus pathogenesis.
  • Further studies are needed to better understand the importance of noncoding RNAs in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, but they offer potential as diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets.

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies in various body parts. Genetic and environmental factors play a role in its progression, but recent research emphasizes the role of epigenetic factors, specifically noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), in the pathogenesis of the disease. A review published in the journal Therapeutic Advances in Chronic Disease highlights the emerging significance of ncRNAs in SLE and their potential as diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets.

Different Mechanisms Involved in the Development of SLE

SLE is a multifactorial disease influenced by genetic, epigenetic, ethnic, immune, hormonal, and environmental factors. These factors lead to abnormal activation of T lymphocytes and other immune cells, causing damage to target organs. The involvement of ncRNAs in SLE pathogenesis has become increasingly evident, with dysregulations in microRNAs, long noncoding RNAs, and circular RNAs contributing to the disease.

The Role of microRNAs in the Development of SLE

MicroRNAs are short, endogenous ncRNAs that perform various functions, including cell cycle regulation, differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, stress tolerance, energy metabolism, and immune response. Several studies have shown associations between microRNA expression in peripheral blood cells, body fluids, and damaged tissues of SLE patients, suggesting their importance as biomarkers in diagnosing autoimmune diseases like SLE.

Conclusion and Future Implications

You May Also Like::  Pathology of the Eye in Vitiligo With Vision Loss

Although a deeper understanding of the role of ncRNAs in SLE’s pathogenesis is needed, their involvement in key signaling pathways and immune system regulation makes them promising diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets. Further research on ncRNAs could lead to the development of targeted therapies for SLE, a disease that currently lacks a definite cure.

Source:

Nour, M. A., Ghorbaninezhad, F., Asadzadeh, Z., Baghbanzadeh, A., Hassanian, H., Leone, P., Jafarlou, M., Alizadeh, N., Racanelli, V., & Baradaran, B. (2023). The emerging role of noncoding RNAs in systemic lupus erythematosus: new insights into the master regulators of disease pathogenesis. Therapeutic Advances in Chronic Disease, 14, 204062232311535. https://doi.org/10.1177/20406223231153572