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Prediabetes is associated with an increased risk for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease among the general population and individuals with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, according to a meta-analysis published online July 15 in The BMJ.

Xiaoyan Cai, from Southern Medical University in Foshan, China, and colleagues conducted an updated meta-analysis to assess the associations between prediabetes and the risk for all-cause mortality and incident cardiovascular disease. Data were included from 129 studies, with 10,069,955 individuals.

The researchers found that during a median follow-up of 9.8 years, prediabetes was associated with an increased risk for all-cause mortality, composite cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and stroke in the general population (relative risks, 1.13, 1.15, 1.16, and 1.14, respectively). For prediabetes versus normoglycemia, the absolute risk difference was 7.36, 8.75, 6.59, and 3.68 per 10,000 person-years for all-cause mortality, composite cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and stroke, respectively. In a median follow-up of 3.2 years, prediabetes was associated with an increased risk for all-cause mortality, composite cardiovascular disease, and coronary heart disease (relative risks, 1.36, 1.37, and 1.15, respectively) but no increased risk for stroke among patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The absolute risk difference in prediabetes versus normoglycemia was 66.19, 189.77, 40.62, and 8.54 per 10,000 person years, respectively, for individuals with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

“Successful intervention in this large population could have a major effect on public health,” the authors write.

Sources:

bmj.com/content/370/bmj.m2297